The Bridge in Ironbridge

When I put up my butterfly picture the other day, I mentioned that it was taken in or near a town in England called Ironbridge. I mentioned that there was a bridge there made of iron, but since I put it in an off-hand way, it might have been overlooked that it is considered a fairly significant bridge. Tish Farrell, who Arkenaten has informed us lives near there, has put up a couple of posts on the subject.

Here are some of the other photos I took that day. I could have sworn that there were some more closeups of the bridge itself, but either I was mistaken or they have gotten separated from my larger collection of photos. These pictures were taken back in 1996 and I scanned them.

The-Ironbridge

We started our walk very near the bridge itself.

Walking-Path

This is the path we followed. (Rant: I originally wrote something else, but WordPress seems bizarrely intent on making their program worse, and my original captioned disappeared.)

Butterfly-ofw

A butterfly.

Buildwas-Abbey-1

Buildwas Abbey.

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8 comments
  1. Lovely,post. You can look for the name of the darn butterfly yourself! 🙂
    Clue: Its name begins with a P.

    And fwiw, it’s ”Tish”

    • fojap said:

      Ooops. I can’t spell to save myself. If there was no such thing as spell check you’d think I was a near illiterate.

    • fojap said:

      You’ve made me feel guilty for being lazy. I usually look these things up. Unless there’s a similar butterfly, I’m guessing that it’s a Peacock.

      • Yes, of course it is! 🙂

        Hope you’re having a great day?

  2. Thanks for the shout-out. Very nice pix of the old bridge too 🙂

    • fojap said:

      When I was in high school, one of my closest friends wanted to be a photographer. We’d take her father’s car and go driving aimlessly looking for abandoned structures which were her favorite subject. Maybe her taste rubbed off on me. There’s something about the textures of older buildings that I’ve always liked.

      I took quite a few pictures of the abbey, but scanning them, then fixing the dust and scratches is a bit tedious.

      • Understandable. Still, very cool to get what you have here.

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